Getting Graphic with Your Novel

It’s always good to get questions as an author, especially on Goodreads. As release day for The Bow of Destiny approaches I’m getting a few questions. One that I found interesting goes as follows in the screenshot:

GR Graphic Novel Q

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

The Answer

Comic BookHonestly, I never even considered the idea but I am interested in the prospect so I decided to do some quick research on the subject. As it turns out, converting novels to graphic novels is a burgeoning market that even traditional publishers are dipping their publishing feet into. Not only that, but even Marvel is adapting a few novels into the graphic format.

So what’s all the fuss?

The graphic novel audience is enthusiastic and hungry for more content. As a novelist, I’m intrigued since this opens doors to more readers and creates a different income stream for my work. I’m not immediately able to work on such a project with my novel coming out in a few weeks but I’m going to follow-up on the idea.

As noted on a podcast by Joanna Penn with graphic artist/novelist, Nathan Massengill, a novel with pretty good sales might be a good candidate for conversion to the graphic format. I know I’ll strongly consider what I’m going to do with my book based on this information. Most writers will never sell movie rights (let alone actually see it go into production) but the graphic novel avenue is the next best thing.

What does it require?

Here are just a few points from which I’m starting but I’m sure this gets more complex:

  • Well, first you need a good, experienced graphic novelist. As shown above, E. J. Nate has offered to do the work so I’ll review what he’s done and start a dialog with him. If that doesn’t work out then I’ll still investigate the possibility elsewhere.
  • Next comes the ability to actually publish said project. If sales are good enough then I might be able to pay for the project out of income. Otherwise, it could become a crowdsourcing project or a reason to contact an agent given the right circumstances.
  • Related to the graphic artist question and the cost comes rights and payment with the graphic artist. This is where things get different for a self-publisher. You’ll need to come to some agreement with the artist on any shared rights. If there are no rights for the artist then you should be prepared to come to an agreement for the conversion work and the cost per page.
  • If you end up gaining an agent for such an ancillary project as conversion to graphic novel and sign with some sort of publisher, be aware that the finished product may have some differences. Much like movie adaptations a graphic novel may have to change the story some. Also, while you may do all the work of converting the concept as a self-publisher, with a publisher you may end up just overseeing the creative team’s efforts. Either way, do your homework on what this process entails.

Drawing 1Resources

Here are a few more links that might interest you on the subject:

Creating Graphic Novels: Adapting and Marketing Stories for a Multi Million Dollar Industry by Sarah Beach

The difference between graphic novel and comic book.

Graphic Novels: Not Just for Kids by Jane Ammeson via NWITimes.com

Conclusion

As one ancillary option for your work, graphic novels can be an interesting prospect to consider. I’ve always been interested in being a hybrid author – being both/either self-published and traditionally published. One goal I’ve had is to attract an agent, especially for negotiating standard rights and tricky ancillary rights for hard copy, audio and foreign language but graphic novels are another piece of the pie to consider. I’ll continue doing my research on this subject and report back on my findings with one or two more posts (most likely in October).

What are your ancillary goals for your novel(s)? Have you considered converting your work to a graphic format? Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. Sign up for my Archer’s Aim Digest mailing list to receive the forthcoming edition of my newsletter with announcements about upcoming releases and events. You’ll receive my a FREE coupon for my short story e-book, The Black Bag which contains a sample chapter of The Bow of Destiny. You’ll also be the first to have news about my books, especially some free offers this summer related to the upcoming release of The Bow of Destiny, the first novel of The Bow of Hart Saga. Speaking of which, it is now available for pre-release orders on Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks (via the iTunes app) & NOW Amazon – Kindle. Additionally, September’s FREE book, What Is Needed is available at Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks and Smashwords & Amazon.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

BOD Final Trading Knives 1 What Is Needed 4 Black Bag Cover 7

Advertisements

12 comments

    1. If you’re like me your mind starts working and you can see where some scenes would really work very well. I’ll email you soon about the offered blog appearance. Thanks for leaving a comment today!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s