non-fiction

More Reviews from My Goodreads Shelf

Reviews from my Goodreads shelf appears to have become a regular feature here on Archer’s Aim. This week, I share more fantasy books along with a non-fiction. You might also notice a slight theme between a couple:

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The Emerald Storm (The Riyria Revelations, #4)The Emerald Storm by Michael J. Sullivan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I like a good sea adventure every now and then so this book in Sullivan’s series was a fresh approach. The author took pains to describe the details of sailing with accuracy as well as the various duties aboard ship. It draws on many of the older tales of sea-faring adventure but in a fantasy format so there are unique aspects to the tale. I enjoyed it and heartily recommend it as a good break from all the land-lubber tales.

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A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea Cycle, #1)A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’ve read and re-read this series a number of times over the year. Le Guin’s writing voice in this series was incredible, capturing the essence of solitude and fortitude in the face of dangers of one’s own making as well as that of the unpredictable sea. This is an excellent tale of Ged’s adventures from childhood to manhood.

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Empire of Blue Water: Captain Morgan's Great Pirate Army, the Epic Battle for the Americas, and the Catastrophe That Ended the Outlaws' Bloody ReignEmpire of Blue Water: Captain Morgan’s Great Pirate Army, the Epic Battle for the Americas, and the Catastrophe That Ended the Outlaws’ Bloody Reign by Stephan Talty
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I read this book a number of years ago but found it an interesting history of piracy. Though it’s a non-fiction, the book an almost fictive quality since pirates can jump off the page. Frequently, these true-life tales have the ring of events described in fiction, movies and television shows and for good reason – they are the basis of fiction. This book covers everything from the politics behind piracy to the daily lives of pirates. As a fantasy author, I also find this book to be good source material. Anyone reading this book will be both entertained and informed about Captain Morgan.

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Elf KillersElf Killers by Carol Marrs Phipps
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Elf Killers is a solid first effort by the authors as the tale of elves attempting to survive the constant threat of trolls who have a taste for them as food. The story features desperate escapes, tragic loss, cunning bad guys (trolls), intrigue and determination all with numerous twists. I kept turning the pages with interest to see what happened. The trolls were especially portrayed in a unique style that draws the reader along with the inevitable dangers that loom for the elves.

There were a number of flaws on the writing as I thought the trolls language was distracting. While the fights were sudden surprises, these scenes needed a bit more description. There was also a bit more telling than I prefer. However, I did want to continue reading regardless of the flaws so don’t fear the shortcomings. I’m very interested in reading what the authors have already published since this book.

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Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. Sign up for my Archer’s Aim Digest mailing list to receive the forthcoming edition of my newsletter with announcements about upcoming releases and events. You’ll receive my a FREE coupon for my short story e-book, The Black Bag which contains a sample chapter of The Bow of Destiny. You’ll also be the first to have news about my books, especially some free offers this summer related to the upcoming release of The Bow of Destiny, the first novel of The Bow of Hart Saga. Speaking of which, it is now available for pre-release orders on Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks & Amazon – Kindle. Additionally, September’s FREE book, What Is Needed is available at Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks and Smashwords & Amazon.

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BOD Final Trading Knives 1 What Is Needed 4 Black Bag Cover 7

Conference Notes Pt. 3: Warm-up Your Pitching Arm

I recently attended a local writing conference and came away with notes on several topics which interested me. The last two weeks, I posted about creating compelling characters and writing for trade publications to supplement your writing income. This week, I’m covering another observation from the conference I attended – going prepared to deliver your best pitch.

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Deliver your best pitch at a writer's conference. Photo courtesy Morguefile.com free section.

Deliver your best pitch at a writer’s conference. Photo courtesy Morguefile.com free section.

I had two friends go with me and they were attending a writing conference for the first time. They came with ideas in mind as well as work ready to pitch to agents that were attending. Since I’m mainly working on self-publishing, I arrived with nothing in mind which is a mistake. Here’s why…

One friend kept talking to a particular fiction agent and got a sit-down meeting with him even though the agent’s calendar was full. This friend, pitched his two fiction book series. The agent passed on the first project but wanted to see the second one. So far my friend was 1 for 2 – not bad on your first try with an agent at your first writing conference. But, since the agent also represented film and TV projects, my friend went for broke and pitched a TV show idea. The agent knew of someone possibly looking for related programming and told my friend to write the pilot. That’s 2 for 3 – amazing!

Next we ate lunch at another agent’s table. The conversation went around with all of us since this agent was quite affable. When asked about anything she was doing, my second friend pitched a non-fiction idea she’d had for a number of years based on some personal experiences. The agent bit and told her he wanted to see her idea within a month using his online template. Wow, this was incredible!

Go to a conference ready to deliver a pitch. Photo courtesy Morguefile.com free section.

Go to a conference ready to deliver a pitch. Photo courtesy Morguefile.com free section.

However, by now you see the lesson learned. I arrived with nothing to pitch. The old adage, “Nothing ventured nothing gained” is apropos in this instance. Take my advice, have a few ideas in mind – maybe even slightly developed – when you go to a conference. You never know what may happen. As writers we are creative and lots of ideas come to mind. Just because you can’t act on it immediately doesn’t mean someone might not be interested in the right circumstances. Also, just because an idea isn’t in your main genre doesn’t mean it can’t be developed – especially non-fiction. And just because you are self-publishing doesn’t mean it eliminates you from other publication opportunities.

So take my advice, attend that next conference with a finished project or non-fiction idea ready to pitch to the nearest agent or editor. You never know what may happen! Don’t get caught sitting on the sidelines. Congratulations to my daring friends – now go get ’em!

Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. I’d also love to connect with you over social media so check my Contact page for that information. I’ve updated the site with a new landing page starting today but you can still view the News page for announcements. As part of the changes, new email subscribers (you won’t be spammed nor sold) will receive my free new guide, 15 Must Have Apps for Self-Publishing Authors. Sign-up today! I’ve added a new sign-up tab on my FaceBook page to simplify the process. Also, the cover of my book, The Bow of Destiny, was revealed recently so take a look.

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Conference Notes Pt. 2: Alternative Writing Income

Having An IdeaIntroduction

I recently attended a local writing conference and came away with notes on several topics which interested me. Last week, I post about creating compelling characters. This week, I turn to a completely different subject but one which may be no less appealing.

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Lately, I’ve been more interested in increasing my current writing income to better fund my fiction and author platform needs. I’ve been writing some short fiction to submit to magazine markets but acceptance is very competitive.

It’s fairly well known that non-fiction pays better per word than fiction. But most consumer non-fiction is pretty competitive also and for someone like me, adding some income sooner rather than later is important for future plans.

However, there is a less competitive alternative if you are willing to give it a try – writing for trade magazines. Trade magazines are basically journals, magazines and newsletters written for specific industries so the audiences are specific. This type of magazine is not the same as a consumer magazine which you see on sale at stores. Personally, I’m still giving this particular option my consideration but I’m leaning toward trying it. Here are some reasons to try it as well as some tips to get started.

WritingReasons To Write For Trade Magazines

1. The barriers to entry in this market are much lower than literary and consumer magazines. There are just fewer writers in this field so there’s less competition.

2. The pay per article or word is generally much higher than literary and consumer magazines.

3. Most trade publications lack staff so use of freelance writers and acceptance of proposed ideas is much higher.

4. Since it’s easier to break into the industry you can quickly build a reputation and branch out into other publications quickly – depending on your need for income and your availability.

Considerations About Style

Because this is a different type of writing there are differences in style which a new trade magazine writer must consider in approaching this market.

  • You should be willing to conduct interviews.
  • You should work to be come familiar with writing in some version of Associated Press style.
  • Learn to write in an inverted pyramid style which means you should have the most important details at the beginning of the story. The least important aspects of the story should go at the end so that if the story needs to have content cut the editor can easily do this. These details are: how, who, what where, when and why of the story.
  • Also in consideration of style, begin with a lede (correct spelling) that is either anecdotal or descriptive. Next include the nut graf or the idea followed by the body. However, all the main details should be in the nut graf in case the story needs to be cut below that point.
Clip Art Image Copyright by Microsoft. Clip Art Used by Permission of Microsoft

Clip Art Image Copyright by Microsoft. Clip Art Used by Permission of Microsoft

Getting Started

Here are further tips to get started writing for trade publications.

1. Learn about the industry you are targeting. You may have more than one interest in mind so learn about each. You are not required to be an expert or even have contacts within the industry but understanding aspects of it are necessary.

2. Read the magazine(s) for the industry that you are targeting. This is one of the best ways to learn about the industry.

3. If you really want to engage your targeted industry more and have the time and/or money, try visiting a convention or trade-show.

4. Once you feel like you have enough insights about your targeted industry pitch an idea to an editor based on the style currently used by the publication. If you already have credits make sure to include these “clips” in a .pdf document so the editor can gauge your writing. If you are brand new, offer to write a piece for free though this is not advised in all cases since it cheapens your value. Instead, offer a sample piece and then volunteer to write an article that you’ve noticed is usually credited to the staff (meaning that it gets written by whoever is available. Note that these are usually shorter pieces and a great way to gain trust).

5. Once you’re working with one or more publications, make sure you communicate your upcoming availability so an editor understands how much work to assign to you. As in my case, I would plan to write limited numbers of articles simply to fund my fiction so I want to spend as little time as possible on trade publications and work on fiction. However, if the publication is mostly on-line the articles will be much less than 1,000 words, usually averaging about 500, so the time investment in actually writing articles can be minimal (the actual time investment would be in interviews and research).

One last note about about what you need to know going into this kind of writing. The interviews may often be setup by the publication or even come from press releases. Also, being factually accurate, especially when quoting people is very important so interviews are often recorded.

Conclusion

So there you have it, one way to supplement your fiction writing with another kind of writing. It can be interesting and fun as well as help you jump-start your fiction writing budget.

Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. I’d also love to connect with you over social media so check my Contact page for that information. I’ve updated the site with a new landing page starting today but you can still view the News page for announcements. As part of the changes, new email subscribers (you won’t be spammed nor sold) will receive my free new guide, 15 Must Have Apps for Self-Publishing Authors. Sign-up today! I’ve added a new sign-up tab on my FaceBook page to simplify the process. Also, the cover of my book, The Bow of Destiny, was revealed recently so take a look.

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Book Cover Green Top & Bottom Cover - Copy                The Black Bag by P H Solomon