Planning

Scrivener Collections Pt. 4: Cut Those MS Weeds with Searches

Photo courtesy Morguefile.com free photos section.

Photo courtesy Morguefile.com free photos section.

Scrivener is a powerful writing tool. I write about it weekly with tips and usage ideas. To read more of my posts click the Scrivener tag or category at the end of the page.

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Just like with a garden, your manuscript needs to be weeded and using a collection in conjunction with searches. In my example from last week, I created a collection for my rough draft to structurally edit my book for style. Now I can add the specifics of what I want to do with this collection.

The last few weeks have been dedicated to the use of collections while editing a manuscript, using my ongoing rough draft, An Arrow Against the Wind, as an example. Part 1 was an introduction to collections. Part 2 covered creating a real-life collection from my manuscript complete with meta-data. Last week, part 3 scratched the surface of using multiple collections with the creation of a new one in my manuscript to edit style.

Scriv Collection SearchBut, it’s important to be clear on the types of collections there are. So far, I’ve used standard collections but there are two other kinds of collections – Search Result Collections and Saved Search Result Collections. The first is used most commonly when you do a search from the upper-right of Scrivener (yes, if you’ve doing searches you’ve been using a collection all along). The next is when you save the search results as a collection.

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Let’s take the Search Result Collection first in this discussion. Whenever you do a search it becomes part of the project in which you are working and can be recalled for future use. However, this collection cannot be edited. So in this instance, if you do a search it will return results specified such as finding all dialog tags using the word “said”. Every instance of said will be highlighted in the manuscript.

Scriv Collections Search Results

If I click on View, slide to collections and choose Search in the fly-out menu and the Search Results bar will appear (along with the results in the documents according to the criteria I’ve chosen). Also displayed are all the folders and scenes where the word appears. Incidentally, this also shows only one collection – to view them all in tabs click Collections in the fly-out menu.

Scriv Collection Search Results Bar

However, I want to save this search into my own collection so I can use this whenever I want. Here’s how to add such a search result: with the Search term still in the upper-right at the spyglass icon, click the down arrow and at the end of the menu click on “Save Search as Collection”.

Scriv Collection Save Search Results  Scriv Collection Save Search Results Dialog

You will see a dialog box appear that allows you to name it and providing information about how to see it. Here’s the final result as I view all my collection tabs with the “said” tab showing.

Scriv Collection Save Search Tab

I can also delete these tabs unlike the regular Search Results Collection tab. I can add as many of these as I need and remove them as I complete editing for them which makes my style editing much easier.

the-bow-of-destiny-by-p-h-solomonAre you using collections in Scrivener yet? How about searches and saved searches? Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. Interested in more of my writing? Just click one of the retailer banners on the sidebar to see more.

IMG_4154-EditAbout the Author

P. H. Solomon lives in the greater Birmingham, AL area where he strongly dislikes yard work and sanding the deck rail. However, he performs these duties to maintain a nice home for his loved ones as well as the family’s German Shepherds. In his spare time, P. H. rides herd as a Computer Whisperer on large computers called servers (harmonica not required). Additionally, he enjoys reading, running, most sports and fantasy football. Having a degree in Anthropology, he also has a wide array of more “serious” interests in addition to working regularly to hone his writing. The Bow of Destiny is his first novel-length title with more soon to come.

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Just as a note: I now have a marketing affiliation with Scrivener. For support questions, pricing, licensing and other concerns please contact the vendor. As such a buy ad for Scrivener appears on the sidebar. I’ve started this program since I like the product so much and want to offer readers the chance to obtain this software. I’m not required to write about Scrivener to be an affiliate; I just like it that much. You can also find my FTC statement on this site’s sidebar.

Privacy Policy

This blog does not share personal information – including email addresses – with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies (which is a WordPress.com function and not mine).

You can turn off the use of cookies at any time by changing your specific browser settings.

I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without our permission.

This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on July 2nd, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly here: ph at phsolomon.com (replace the “at” with @, it’s written that way to avoid spammers).

 

Formatting Pt. 3: The Secrets Of Internal Bookmarks & Hyperlinks

This is the 3rd part of a how-to series covering e-book formatting. The previous posts are:

The Great Formatting Conundrum & What To Do About It

Styling Your E-Book With Proper Formatting

Going In CirclesIf you’ve ever started going somewhere unfamiliar you may have realized you were confused about where you were going or just in the incorrect location altogether. It can be a frustrating feeling to not quite understand how to get where you want to be. The same can be true of an e-book that is incorrectly formatted with internal hyperlinks or lacks them entirely.

But what are internal hyperlinks and bookmarks? These are links just like in this post that lead to other posts. However in the case of an e-book they help the reader navigate through the content.

But if an e-reader saves the last place where you were reading, why are internal hyperlinks and bookmarks needed? In the case of fiction they may not be needed at all but they are convenience to the reader which allows them to get back to the contents page easily should they need to do so. It can be more important if you are writing a work of non-fiction where readers may want to jump to other content within a book or chapter.

Here’s a quick how-to about making internal links should you deem the necessary in your e-book? I’ll again reference from the Smashwords Style Guide by Mark Coker which has more in-depth instructions. But for now, here are the basics. If you are doing your own formatting strongly suggest using this guide or something similar.

  1. You need a Table of Contents for your book. You should include one that shows your chapters as well as the various pages of front material as well as what you may add as additional information at the end of your book. Also, make sure your chapters have titles even if it’s as simple as “Chapter 1”.

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  1. Next, you’ll open Word and add your bookmarks. To do so, highlight the text you are hyperlinking and then click “Insert” on Word’s ribbon menu and then choose “Bookmark”.

Format Insert Menu

  1. Type the name of your bookmark without spaces and click add. For example for “Chapter 1” add “Chapter1” (no spaces). Also, you may find it best to add all your chapter bookmarks first.

Format Create Bookmarks

  1. Now create hyperlinks in your Table of Contents by highlighting the text and right-clicking on it to see the context menu.

Format Context Menu

Then click on “Hyperlink” and the “Insert Hyperlink” window will then appear like below:

Format Insert Hyperlink

  1. From the left side of the window click “Place in this document” and you will see a list of your bookmarks. In this example choose “Chapter1” (not pictured since I used my short story for the screen-shots). Repeat steps 4 & 5 for all the chapters and sections you are linking to your table of contents.
  2. Conversely, you can also link all your chapters to the table of contents by highlighting the title, “Table of Contents” and create a bookmark for it as in steps 2 & 3. After that, you go to each of your chapter or section titles and follow steps 4 & 5 but always choose the bookmark you created for “Table of Contents”.
  3. Test that each link jumps you to chapters and back to the table of contents. Correct as necessary. The best way to view formatting and test your hyperlinks is by using Adobe Digital Editions which is a free download.

Using bookmarks and hyperlinks is a great way to let your readers jump through your e-book with little effort. It’s also important to use these for other pages in the book such as acknowledgments, copyright, your biography page, etc.

Have you formatted bookmarks and hyperlinks for your e-books? Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. I’d also love to connect with you over social media so check my Contact page for that information.

IMG_4154-EditAbout the Author

P. H. Solomon lives in the greater Birmingham, AL area where he strongly dislikes yard work and sanding the deck rail. However, he performs these duties to maintain a nice home for his loved ones as well as the family’s German Shepherds. In his spare time, P. H. rides herd as a Computer Whisperer on large computers called servers (harmonica not required). Additionally, he enjoys reading, running, most sports and fantasy football. Having a degree in Anthropology, he also has a wide array of more “serious” interests in addition to working regularly to hone his writing. The Bow of Destiny is his first novel-length title with more soon to come. To find out more about The Bow of Destiny, click over to one of these online retailers displayed on the sidebar ===>

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Inspection! What Scrivener’s Other Bar Does

Scrivener is a powerful writing tool. I write about it weekly with tips and usage ideas. To read more of my posts click the Scrivener tag or category at the end of the page.

On the left side there’s that lovely organizational wonder: the Binder. It provides all the flexibility to arrange your ideas and change the writing structure with ease. It’s one of the features that makes for the wonder that is Scrivener.

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But on the right side there’s nothing – unless you turn on the Inspector Bar. Just click View and glide down to reveal the Layout menu and there it is. Upon turning this tool-bar on you find a number of features that may at first beguile you as mundane functions. However, the Inspector was designed with a purpose: managing your content. You’ll notice that there are several buttons at the bottom of the Inspector as well as several arrows. Let’s take a look at the features available, some of which you may find useful based on your type of writing projects.

Formatting_Page Break Before

Scriv Inspector Notes1. Notes: this first button includes several features that can be collapsed or left open. Synopsis shows the notecard that also appears in the corkboard and it can be closed by clicking the arrow beside the feature title. Next, there’s Meta-Data which allows you to manage the status of the particular document in which you are working and it can also be closed. These two features stay available on the first three buttons. Last is the Documents Notes where you can add all kinds of pertinent information to your work as if they were sticky notes.

Sciv Inspect DocRefs2. Click on the next button over to reveal Document References. This is where you can add Scrivener and external links either of which you may frequently use for reference. This can be especially handy for non-fiction writing where lots of research at the click of your mouse can save you a lot of time.

Scriv Inspect Keywords3. Moving over again you will find Keywords. This is where you can add all kinds of frequently used terms from your project. It’s a helpful location for keeping character and location names organized for quick reference. Writing fantasy, this is a big help for me since you can forget some details and need references in an accessible location.

Scriv Inspect CMD4. The next button over is Custom Meta-Data which allows you to tweak meta-data settings for your project to suite your tastes. This is a great place for c0-authors to designate their tasks by color for differentiation.

5. The next to last button is for Snapshots. If you haven’t used this feature previously, it Scirv Inspect Snapshotstakes a snapshot of your current work which is useful when you want to make changes but might want to revert back to the original. Click the +/- buttons to add and remove snapshots. There’s also the Rollback button available to switch back to the previous version.

Scriv Inspect CF6. Last, there the Footnotes and Comments button which is where you can add these to your non-fiction. The comments feature is similar to the same one in Word and can be useful whether you are writing fiction or non-fiction.

These are all extremely helpful tools for fiction and/or non-fiction writing. They are easily found from the Inspector to allow users to quickly manage content. Some of these functions may bear further discussion in later posts. A number of these features may or may not seem useful at first glance, however you may want to give them a try to see if they help you develop your project more efficiently. If you are c0-authoring a book this is a great way to keep things straight between the two of you.

Book Cover Green Top & Bottom Cover - CopyHave you use the Inspector bar much or at all? Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. Interested in more of my writing? Just click one of the retailer banners on the sidebar to see more.

IMG_4154-EditAbout the Author

P. H. Solomon lives in the greater Birmingham, AL area where he strongly dislikes yard work and sanding the deck rail. However, he performs these duties to maintain a nice home for his loved ones as well as the family’s German Shepherds. In his spare time, P. H. rides herd as a Computer Whisperer on large computers called servers (harmonica not required). Additionally, he enjoys reading, running, most sports and fantasy football. Having a degree in Anthropology, he also has a wide array of more “serious” interests in addition to working regularly to hone his writing. The Bow of Destiny is his first novel-length title with more soon to come.

Sign-up to receive my free ebooks today.

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Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Just as a note: I now have a marketing affiliation with Scrivener. For support questions, pricing, licensing and other concerns please contact the vendor. As such a buy ad for Scrivener appears on the sidebar. I’ve started this program since I like the product so much and want to offer readers the chance to obtain this software. I’m not required to write about Scrivener to be an affiliate; I just like it that much. You can also find my FTC statement on this site’s sidebar.

Privacy Policy

This blog does not share personal information – including email addresses – with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies (which is a WordPress.com function and not mine).

You can turn off the use of cookies at any time by changing your specific browser settings.

I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without our permission.

This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on July 2nd, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly here: ph at phsolomon.com (replace the “at” with @, it’s written that way to avoid spammers).