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Indiegogo Anthology Project: Still Waters

Looking for hopeful fantasy? A noblebright fantasy may be just what you’re seeking. Check out this Indiegogo anthology project for “Still Waters” and consider lending your support. The page explains everything.

Deep POV Tips Part 4: Of Sneaks and Shallow POV

Editing for Deep POV

Editing for Deep POV

Last month I attended a webinar the subject of which was deep third person POV and I then started this series. Part 1 (including links to other deep POV resources),   Part 2 & Part 3 of this series are available if you want to catch-up on the topic. As promised, here are more tips gleaned from the presentation that you may find helpful as I know they will be for me.

Sam: What are you up to? Sneaking off, are we?
Gollum: Sneaking? Sneaking? Fat Hobbit is always so polite. Smeagol shows them secret ways that nobody else could find, and they say “sneak!” Sneak? Very nice friend. Oh, yes, my precious. Very nice, very nice.
Sam: All right, all right! You just startled me is all. What were you doing?
Gollum: Sneaking.
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

There’s often a sneak creeping through writing that hurts deep POV. It’s pervasive and slowly sucks the life, excitement and tension from a book like Gollum with a filched egg.

Gollum: [singing] The rock and pool, is nice and cool, so juicy sweet. Our only wish,
[he whacks the fish on the rock]
Gollum: to catch a fish,
[another whack]
Gollum: so juicy sweet.
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)

Before you know it, the sneak is stealing all the fish in your writing and singing about it while you go blithely along with the story.

Be careful of the sneak! Don’t let him follow you from that log in the river! Beware lest you find your work rife with all kinds of sneaky, thieving, well you know…

So what’s so sneaky in deep POV and how can it be fixed? Prepositions. But not just any old prepositions, just the sneaky ones. Preposition are necessary except for those that express emotion.

Here are some shallow/deep examples our presenter, Delia Latham, used in her presentation, “Demystifying Deep POV”:

Sneaks in Writing

Sneaky Prepostion Examples

See the sneaks and how they work little bits of mischief in the narrative? Yet in the deeper examples there’s more lively, creative expression.

Have you got sneaks in your writing? Share how you root them out in by leaving a comment.

Please see my Contact page for ways to connect with me and view my News page for information on my current fundraising campaign for The Bow of Destiny on Indiegogo which ends on 9/5. Also read the companion blog serial for The Bow of Destiny entitled “What is Needed“. New links to reviews for The Black Bag have been post on the Store page so check those out if you are interested in a short fantasy read.

I’m always interested in comments so please feel free to leave them below. Also, remember that followers of this blog via email receive a coupon to download my short ebook, The Black Bag, from Smashwords so sign-up today.

Thanks for reading!

PHS


BOD FinalAbout the Author

P. H. SolIMG_4154-Editomon lives in the greater Birmingham, AL area where he strongly dislikes yard work and sanding the deck rail. However, he performs these duties to maintain a nice home for his loved ones as well as the family’s German Shepherds. In his spare time, P. H. rides herd as a Computer Whisperer on large computers called servers (harmonica not required). Additionally, he enjoys reading, running, most sports and fantasy football. Having a degree in Anthropology, he also has a wide array of more “serious” interests in addition to working regularly to hone his writing. The Bow of Destiny is his first novel-length title with more soon to come.

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Getting Graphic with Your Novel

It’s always good to get questions as an author, especially on Goodreads. As release day for The Bow of Destiny approaches I’m getting a few questions. One that I found interesting goes as follows in the screenshot:

GR Graphic Novel Q

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The Answer

Comic BookHonestly, I never even considered the idea but I am interested in the prospect so I decided to do some quick research on the subject. As it turns out, converting novels to graphic novels is a burgeoning market that even traditional publishers are dipping their publishing feet into. Not only that, but even Marvel is adapting a few novels into the graphic format.

So what’s all the fuss?

The graphic novel audience is enthusiastic and hungry for more content. As a novelist, I’m intrigued since this opens doors to more readers and creates a different income stream for my work. I’m not immediately able to work on such a project with my novel coming out in a few weeks but I’m going to follow-up on the idea.

As noted on a podcast by Joanna Penn with graphic artist/novelist, Nathan Massengill, a novel with pretty good sales might be a good candidate for conversion to the graphic format. I know I’ll strongly consider what I’m going to do with my book based on this information. Most writers will never sell movie rights (let alone actually see it go into production) but the graphic novel avenue is the next best thing.

What does it require?

Here are just a few points from which I’m starting but I’m sure this gets more complex:

  • Well, first you need a good, experienced graphic novelist. As shown above, E. J. Nate has offered to do the work so I’ll review what he’s done and start a dialog with him. If that doesn’t work out then I’ll still investigate the possibility elsewhere.
  • Next comes the ability to actually publish said project. If sales are good enough then I might be able to pay for the project out of income. Otherwise, it could become a crowdsourcing project or a reason to contact an agent given the right circumstances.
  • Related to the graphic artist question and the cost comes rights and payment with the graphic artist. This is where things get different for a self-publisher. You’ll need to come to some agreement with the artist on any shared rights. If there are no rights for the artist then you should be prepared to come to an agreement for the conversion work and the cost per page.
  • If you end up gaining an agent for such an ancillary project as conversion to graphic novel and sign with some sort of publisher, be aware that the finished product may have some differences. Much like movie adaptations a graphic novel may have to change the story some. Also, while you may do all the work of converting the concept as a self-publisher, with a publisher you may end up just overseeing the creative team’s efforts. Either way, do your homework on what this process entails.

Drawing 1Resources

Here are a few more links that might interest you on the subject:

Creating Graphic Novels: Adapting and Marketing Stories for a Multi Million Dollar Industry by Sarah Beach

The difference between graphic novel and comic book.

Graphic Novels: Not Just for Kids by Jane Ammeson via NWITimes.com

Conclusion

As one ancillary option for your work, graphic novels can be an interesting prospect to consider. I’ve always been interested in being a hybrid author – being both/either self-published and traditionally published. One goal I’ve had is to attract an agent, especially for negotiating standard rights and tricky ancillary rights for hard copy, audio and foreign language but graphic novels are another piece of the pie to consider. I’ll continue doing my research on this subject and report back on my findings with one or two more posts (most likely in October).

What are your ancillary goals for your novel(s)? Have you considered converting your work to a graphic format? Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section. Sign up for my Archer’s Aim Digest mailing list to receive the forthcoming edition of my newsletter with announcements about upcoming releases and events. You’ll receive my a FREE coupon for my short story e-book, The Black Bag which contains a sample chapter of The Bow of Destiny. You’ll also be the first to have news about my books, especially some free offers this summer related to the upcoming release of The Bow of Destiny, the first novel of The Bow of Hart Saga. Speaking of which, it is now available for pre-release orders on Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks (via the iTunes app) & NOW Amazon – Kindle. Additionally, September’s FREE book, What Is Needed is available at Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks and Smashwords & Amazon.

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BOD Final Trading Knives 1 What Is Needed 4 Black Bag Cover 7