To Sequel or Not to Sequel – It’s a Good Question

Hello to all the Archer’s Aim readers. Life has been a whirlwind lately but I’ve been making some progress on several writing projects. However, I wanted to pause and answer a question that seems to get bigger and bigger with each month:

Will there be another book to The Bow of Hart Saga?

Based on the number of these questions I’m getting, there likely will be another book but not as part of the core trilogy that is currently out. I know that I left the door open for another book or two and that was somewhat by design. I understand that, while I’ve wrapped up the series nicely, there are fans who want more. Honestly, the request for a sequel cropped up from my daughter who also asked for a prequel series. So, I left the saga with a bit of an opening to move toward a sequel as opportunity allowed.


Why not just write another book or two for the saga? There are several reasons not to write anything new immediately. One will become clear very soon. However, another reason is that I have several other projects in the works that are under proposal to publishers at the moment. I need to complete these as soon as I can. I’m also working on development of another series named The Broken Shield Chronicles

Yet, I have been getting the requests for more about Athson and Limbreth and I’m pleased so many people like these characters and want more from them. Since I’m getting these sequel requests, I’m happy to give readers more as soon as I can. I have begun consideration for at least a sequel and maybe another trilogy along with a prequel.

However, to provide a further taste of the world of Denaria, I’m also going to write a short series named the Goddess Veil. Each book should be short but will include some possible cameos from a few minor characters in The Bow of Hart Saga as well as a villain (readers can guess who it is). I just need some time to get this series and the sequel underway as fast as I can.

I suppose I never expected this debut series to do as well as it has so I never planned anything else except to finish what I started long ago (meaning several decades). Let me start the process now and ask readers a few questions:

Who are your favorite characters?

What do you see happening to some of these characters?

What questions do you still have about Denaria that you think would interest you in a sequel?

A few ideas have presented themselves to me so far, but I’d love to hear readers thoughts about what intrigues them so I can address them. Are you interested in learning more about Withlings? Do dwarves interest you? Are there other places you see on the big map that draw your attention? Do you want to know what happens in Hart? What will happen in Grendon?

There are any number of ways another book can go and I’m happy to consider suggestions. Please leave your thoughts in the comments below this post or contact me using my email address or other social media. If you would like to read some alpha or beta material, please let me know and we can set up a discussion group somewhere or you can join me in my Facebook or Goodreads private groups. In the meantime, look for a big announcement about The Bow of Hart Saga next week that should clarify why I’m waiting just a little while with the next editions and why I’m leaving the series in its current form as a trilogy.


The Bow of Destiny Commentary Pt. 1: The Beginning

the-bow-of-destiny-by-p-h-solomon1I thought it would be interesting to share some commentary about the beginning of The Bow of Destiny now that the book has been out for a while, sold well and the next book should be released in just a few months. The Bow of Destiny has a curious beginning for many people that’s at once perplexing, confusing and intriguing. This effect is done on purpose and I’ll share a bit about it now.

The Bow of Destiny is written using the technique of deep point-of-view where readers hopefully become deeply engaged with the perceptions of the point-of-view character. There are a few other aspects mixed into this, one being that there are little, to no, dialogue tags in the book – all the dialogue is contextual. Secondly, with the deep point-of-view, internalization is signaled – or tagged – with physical actions by the character. As such, the internal thoughts, mood and emotions of the character are not italicized since these are deep enough into the chracter-reader engagement to not be set apart in such a way. Lastly, when italics are used it is for a specific, ongoing experience for the POV character. In such cases, hallucinations, dreams, memories, visions and other such experiences of the character are italicized as a special indicator that something different is happening for the character. I also used a present tense instead of past tense to cue the reader that this is a present experience for the character. It’s important to note that the tense only has changed and not the character POV.

There are other details to consider in the opening of the book of which a reader should be aware. For instance, Athson is hunting small game when the story begins and he has a choice between his prey, a pheasant and a wild rabbit. This signifies that Athson will be presented with choices all along his upcoming journey in the series. Athson believes that he’s making the best choice for his shot with his bow and arrow – the easiest one. However, when presented with more information, he makes a split-second decision and changes his aim to the pheasant.

AthsonThis quick change from rabbit to bird amid varying wind conditions shows that Athson is an expert with the bow. He is also functioning under the belief that he makes good and wise decisions with the information he has. Thus the stage is set for him to begin making decisions which become increasingly difficult and challenging to him and the overall outcome. This one decision shows both what the character thinks about himself and his relationship to his world and that this belief will be challenged in ways he has not considered.

Athson is a challenging character for many reasons, some of which I’ll get into during some upcoming commentary about him in this opening set of scenes. However, Athson’s choice, mixed with the discussed aspects of writing this blog series, couple to allow the reader to experience Athson’s belief in himself for good or bad.

Next week, I’ll dig a little deeper into this opening scene and attempt to offer a bit more about Athson’s state of mind. I found this scene difficult, tricky and daring all at once so there are a lot of layers to what’s going in with Athson that set the stage for the whole story. Thanks for reading today. Please leave comments below and check back next week for another post about this topic.

To find out more about The Bow of Destiny, click over to where you can also find it in Kindle Unlimited:


IMG_4154-EditAbout the Author

P. H. Solomon lives in the greater Birmingham, AL area where he strongly dislikes yard work and sanding the deck rail. However, he performs these duties to maintain a nice home for his loved ones as well as the family’s German Shepherds. In his spare time, P. H. rides herd as a Computer Whisperer on large computers called servers (harmonica not required). Additionally, he enjoys reading, running, most sports and fantasy football. Having a degree in Anthropology, he also has a wide array of more “serious” interests in addition to working regularly to hone his writing. The Bow of Destiny is his first novel-length title with more soon to come.

Quotes from The White Arrow #1

“No, I have to go find my mother. You can’t stop me from that. I let all the rest of them die. I can’t let her die too.” He reached for his sword, but it wasn’t at his side. He sat up and twisted his head in several directions, his breath heaving. “Where is it? Did you steal it?” He gripped the trapper by his coat. “I need that sword.” Athson to the trapper

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